Why Are MOT’s Important?

Annual MOT tests are legally required, and all car owners bemoan when the time comes for another MOT: but why are they so important?

Safety and Roadworthy

The MOT test was introduced in 1960 in an attempt to reduce the number of annual car crashes that were occurring across Britain. A large portion of these crashes were due to under performing cars that had not been well maintained by their owners. In order to increase road safety, all cars were subjected to a mandatory test where examiners would look at both the interior and exterior of the vehicle to check for any faults that could lead to a serious system failure.

If the vehicle fails the examiners test, then the driver needs to fix the issue immediately before it is driven again, otherwise the car becomes illegal to be driven on the road.

What do examiners check for?

The MOT test looks at all parts of your vehicle including:

  • Headlights and Indicators
  • Brake Lights
  • Number Plate
  • Wheels and Tyres
  • Windscreen/Wipers/Wash level
  • Fuel and Engine Levels
  • Doors
  • Vehicle Structure
  • Seats and Seatbelts
  • Horn
  • Warning Lights
  • Mirrors
  • Suspension
  • Exhaust System

What happens to a vehicle with no MOT certificate?

If your car fails its MOT or you don’t have one carried out, then you will not have an up-to-date MOT certificate. Without this certificate you will be unable to renew your road tax.

If you choose to drive a vehicle that hasn’t passed its MOT and are involved in a crash, then your insurance company will invalidate your insurance, meaning you will be responsible for paying for both yours and the other person’s repairs personally. Just being caught driving without an MOT can mean you end up lumped with a £1000 fine.

The average pass rate for MOT tests are around 60% and can be carried out 28 days before the expiry date without affecting it, making It easier than ever to have your vehicle tested.

Visit V12 Sports and Classics if you are in the market for used cars.